What is a "Nutmeg" ???

by Mick M on April 13th, 2011

At a recent (admittedly late) Tuesday evening in the Bull, the discussion moved on to “What is a Nutmeg?” Opinion was divided – well actually it was Mike C vs The Rest Of The World. Mike C reckoned a Nutmeg occurs when you push the ball between a player’s legs, and then nip round him and take repossession of the ball and carry on playing. Everyone else thought a Nutmeg was simply the action of passing the ball through other player’s legs. What do YOU think? Have your say by simply leaving your comment in the box below. If the text box is not visible please click on "more" at the bottom right hand of this section.


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11 Comments

steve - April 13th, 2011 at 4:16 AM
well my (admittedly correct) understanding of what constitutes a nutmeg is, the deliberate act off shooting, passing OR dribbling the ball through anopponent's legs. end of discussion......
Graham Feck Wray - April 13th, 2011 at 4:53 AM
This is from Wikipedia (so that makes it right):

A nutmeg (or tunnel) is a technique used in football or field hockey, in which a player plays the ball through an opponent's legs. This can be whilst passing to another player, shooting or occasionally to carry on and retrieve it himself.

Rest my case.....

Mick will now need to return to his memory bank of previous games and accept that, on very rare occasions, he too has been on the receiving end of a "Nutmeg" :-)
Brec - April 13th, 2011 at 5:05 AM
I think Mike's correct. Typically, the nutmegged person is made to look foolish by the nutmegger, as the nutmegger slips the ball through nutmegee's legs and collects it again. This manoevre should be accompanied by the nutmegger whispering 'Megs' under their breath to really piss the nutmegee off.
Brec - April 13th, 2011 at 5:08 AM
Nutmeg is cockney rhyming slang for 'leg'.
Brec - April 13th, 2011 at 5:16 AM
If you spell nutmeg backwards you get 'gemtun'. If you google 'gemtun' youw will get 'Gumtree'. Gumtree is an extensive network of online classifieds and community websites. This has nothing to do with football.
steve - April 13th, 2011 at 9:05 AM
i'd expect you to know about nutmegs Brec having had me do it to you so often
AJ - April 13th, 2011 at 9:57 AM
I think in principle Rocky is correct!!

A skillful maneuver in which a player plays the ball through the legs of an opposing player and runs on to take the ball again.

However as it has become more commonly used and adopted people use it when they make a pass or score through the keepers legs!! I hate to say it but I agree with the Spurs fan!!

AJ


Brec - April 13th, 2011 at 11:58 AM
Steve, I could nutmeg you, read the Beano, peel an orange and kick your ass in one move

steve - April 16th, 2011 at 3:42 AM
i find that hard to believe brec - the last time you played footy was with your old cork studded boots!

maybe see you in the pub later, where all your real sports take place ;-)
Nutmegger - April 13th, 2011 at 12:02 PM
Steve, you know so much more than me about dribbling!
Brec - April 13th, 2011 at 12:07 PM
One for Rocky's side...

Nutmeg
By footballtrivia

A nutmeg is the art of passing a ball to oneself, through the legs of an opposing player.

The term nutmeg appears to have arisen from two sources. In England ‘nutmegs’ was slang term for testicles, and the link from this to a ball between the legs isn’t exactly rocket science. The other source is the verb nutmeg, which means to deceive or trick someone, and also make the victim of the deception appear naive or foolish. This term was coined during the trading of nutmegs between the U.S. and England in the 19th century. As nutmegs were a valuable resource, some shady exporters would mix wood with their produce to get a higher profit per yield.

The nutmeg can also be referred to as ‘nuts’, and you have to say it immediately after doing it to a player, just as you are running past him. This also guarantees that he will hack you down later in the game, so use it wisely.

Brec

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